How To Treat Stains On Postal Uniforms

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If you’re one of those who work for the postal service, postal uniforms are important for the job – that’s why it’s imperative to keep it spotless and clean. This is because they go out too often and meet plenty of people as they do. That may not always be possible, however. You may cut your hand and have blood stains on your shirt, your dog may jump at you with muddy paws, and you may spill cola or juice on it while having lunch. Though some stains may not be entirely your fault, nothing is more putting off that a man wearing a stained uniform. So, if you are part of the unfortunate who happen to have their postal uniforms stained – what can you do to get them clean?

The Three Enemies

Funny Postal Uniform

Funny Postal Uniform

Before you get started, you should know that there are three kinds of stains, and your first assignment is to learn how to distinguish and segregate any stain according to its kind. That way, you know what to do when something wrong happens to your uniform. The first ones are greasy stains, the kind caused my grease, cooking oil, machine grease, butter and the like. This can simply be pre-treated by directly rubbing some detergent on the stain. But generally, it can be easily removed by washing the uniform. The next kind of stains are non – greasy stains. These can be from tea, juice, ink and food coloring. The best way to treat the stain is to use a sponge and rub it with cold water, and hen soaking it in cold water with detergent. The last type of stain is called a combination stain. You can get combination stains like coffee and cream, lipsticks and salad dressings on your postal uniform anytime. To treat postal uniforms that have combination stains, you should double treat it by first treating the non – greasy elements and then treating the greasy elements after.

When it comes to postal uniforms, getting it clean is absolutely necessary. And when you know the type of stain you’re dealing with, cleaning becomes absolutely easy.

Photo by Richard Moross.

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